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2017 International Polymer Clay Awards Results

View the Galleries of all participants by clicking this link.

Congratulations to all the winners and participants.

Best In Show

 1922 AA MM 2a 1922 AA NSHA 1a 

Best in Show       Juror’s Choice >> TIE

Georg Dinkel       Day of Judgement

Best in Show       Juror’s and Member’s Choice >> TIE

Georg Dinkel       The Rat Ship

Overall                    Best in Show       Member’s Choice

Georg Dinkel       The Rat Ship

2017 IPCA Awards – Emerging Artists

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2017 International Polymer Clay Awards Gallery

IPCAwardsIt is with great excitement that we launch the 2017 IPCA Awards Gallery

This year’s theme was “To Boldly Go.”  There were 28 competitors from 11 countries. The juror and members' choice winners will be announced on August 16 at the Synergy4 closing banquet. The winners will be posted here shortly thereafter.

Click here to view the galleries.

Congratulations to all these bold artists:

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IPCA Announcing the 2015 International Polymer Clay Award Winners

Grand Prize Winner

Wendy Jorre de St Jorre

Grace

 WendyJorredestjorre 002 - final
 

Members' Choice Grand Prize Winner

Georg Dinkel

TV Schrein – TV Shrine

 2015 G Dinkel 1a  2015 G Dinkel 1b 

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Emerging Artists - Non-functional Sculpture and Hanging Art

Hover your cursor over each image to see the artist's name and information about the work.

Click the Details button to view a second image of the work, if available.

Click the Next button at the bottom of the page to view the next gallery.


Nikolina Otržan

Nikolina Otržan

To boldly go where no cats have gone before... - collection

It's 2350 and cats decided it was a high time they started exploring the Universe themselves. They'd built their first Cruiser and off they went. Their first colony was in the Alpha quadrant. They wanted to keep close to Federation since they'd heard that they are creatures out there even scarier than humans, so they figured out it's better to stick to already known enemies.

And, of course, they wanted to get their hands on Federation's replicators, so they never had to worry about having enough food again. Next ship they built was a Napper. Napper's never gotten a replicator, but it had a huge supplies of catnip. By the way, catnip was a ticket if you wanted to visit those cats, they would never receive anybody without it. Once dog delegation came knocking without catnip. Cats let them in, took them hostages and made their relatives build them a brand new docking station. :) Then they built the Explorer. It's not that they really needed it, but some older cats were getting really fed up with those kittens constantly running around, so that was the perfect way to get rid of them. For a while, at least. And when they thought they can finally enjoy some peace and quiet, the Borg came. So they needed another ship… and another…“

All those pieces were made only out of polymer clay and they are completely hollow. Napper is also a brooch and Cruiser is a pendant. Cruiser has a little round about inside, so the cord is fed around it. Defender also has 2 round abouts, so basically it could be transformed into a pendant. Size wise, Cruiser measures 8x5 cm, Napper 9,5x3 cm, Explorer 11x2 cm, Defender 16x3 cm and the Docking station is 11x5x10.

Fiona Abel-Smith

Fiona Abel-Smith

One small step....one giant leap

Dreams of flight aren’t restricted to man, and preparing to take that first step into the unknown has called to many a soul. In this case, tales of wondrous dragons inspire a humble lizard to take to the skies. He builds a hang glider from twigs, leaves and petals ready to launch into the air, to boldly go where dragons went before. The top of the glider is covered in leaves, the bottom made up with a colourful array of petals, he clings on tight to the frame and takes that one small step. Made completely from Polymer Clay on a wired frame with a small hidden brick base for ballast, the whole piece is precariously balanced on one point, as the lizard takes that final step. The weight of the hang glider needed to be kept to a minimum in order to maintain the balance, but the overall feeling of launching off the stones was paramount.

The piece is 13 x 11.5 x 12 inches, (33 x 29 x 30cm).

Emerging Artists - Mixed Media

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Click the Details button to view a second image of the work, if available.

Click the Next button at the bottom of the page to view the next gallery.


Yen Lotherington

Yen Lotherington

TREE OF LIFE

As a MM bas relief artist, I have worked predominantly with air dry clays, paper, wood and acrylic gels. Then some years ago, my daughter took an art class in polymer clay. I played with it a little with her but did not pursue it.

Then I noticed more and more pictures of beautiful polymer clay creations with very diverse finishes, posted on the internet. This piqued my interest so last year, I decided “to boldly go” with polymer clay.

My evolutionary “Tree of Life” is my first piece made substantially from this material. All of the 81 animals (except the ants, dragonfly and brittle star), are made from polymer clay.

As it was my first attempt with this medium, I made a small mountain of mistakes on my way to developing the final animals. It certainly was challenging but it was a very rewarding experience too.

I enjoy the amazing versatility of polymer clay and intend to work more in this medium in future.

Materials: Polymer Clay, Sukerukun Resin Clay, Coarse Pumice Gel, Pouring Gel, Glitter, Acrylic Paint Dimensions: 78cm X 58cm (31 inches X 23 inches)

幹子	伊鍋 (Masako Inabe)

幹子 伊鍋 (Masako Inabe)

Washi lamp

I used Japanese traditional craft paper "washi" and "wood"

Beverly Chesterby

Beverly Chesterby

Desert Driftwood Brooch #1

The Desert Driftwood jewelry features polymer clay with bits of weathered manzanita picked up on my hikes in the high desert foothills of central Arizona. I wanted to find a way to combine these delicious little wooden pieces with polymer clay and had that "ah-ha" moment when I saw pictures of painted sticks. Each piece offers an opportunity for an individual "design dialog." The wood pretty much is what it is and my job is to pay attention and see where it leads me.

Polymer Clay and Weathered Manzanita

3-1/4" x 1" x 1/2"

Beverly Chesterby

Beverly Chesterby

Desert Driftwood Brooch Pair

The two pieces of wood in this brooch pair are from the same old manzanita skeleton. In the arid high desert climate, the branches take many years to decompose. They just break into smaller and smaller pieces of very hard wood. These aren't broken to size, but were found together and just seemed to want to stay that way. They were in the morning shadow of an eleven foot granite "chimney" in our foothills that looks just like the figure of a pregnant woman. Her name is Eve and she is 1.735 billion (yes, with a "b") years old!

Polymer Clay and Weathered Manzanita

5-3/8" x 1/2" x 1/2" (each)

Beverly Chesterby

Beverly Chesterby

Desert Driftwood Brooch #3

What can I say? The weird design dialog with this stubby piece of manzanita amused me all along the way. It's not at all what I consider "my style," but it just seemed to want to turn out like this. I live in a remote mountainous off-grid location at the edge of the National Forest. While I haven't personally had any UFO sightings or been abducted by aliens or anything like that, this is exactly the kind of place you'd expect it. If this brooch looks a little "other worldly" it really isn't my fault. Just sayin'...

Polymer Clay, Weathered Manzanita, Mica Powder

4-1/4" x 1-1/2" x 3/4"

Emerging Artists - Functional Containers

Hover your cursor over each image to see the artist's name and information about the work.

Click the Details button to view a second image of the work, if available.

Click the Next button at the bottom of the page to view the next gallery.


Teresa Torba Stepp

Teresa Torba Stepp

Moon Glow Enchanted Moth Trinket/Treasure Box

Moon Glow Enchanted Moth Trinket/Treasure Box featuring a lovely majestic moth amidst a bounty of deep blue, green and purple polymer clay floral foliage. Elegantly accented with mosaic crystal beads and gems then lightly dusted in shimmering iridescent mica powders. This vintage Italian gilt wood box includes a hand sewn satin pillow adorned with a vintage Czech glass button.

Teresa Torba Stepp

Teresa Torba Stepp

Fairy Tale 'Happily Ever After' Trinket/Treasure Box

Fairy Tale 'Happily Ever After' Trinket/Treasure Box featuring a whimsical dragonfly amidst a golden backdrop surrounded by a field of deep purple and blue polymer clay floral scrolls. Finely jeweled with mosaic accent charms and crystals then finely dusted in shimmery mica iridescence. This vintage Italian gilt box includes a hand sewn Chinese brocade pillow adorned with a vintage Czech glass button.

Teresa Torba Stepp

Teresa Torba Stepp

River Rain Wooden Jungle Elephant Trinket/Treasure Box

River Rain Wooden Jungle Elephant Trinket/Treasure Box showcasing a hand sculpted polymer clay ornamental elephant embedded in a forest of deep green and purple polymer clay foliage further accented with mosaic charms and beads then finely dusted with shimmering iridescent mica powders. This hand stamped and stained wood box includes a hand sewn satin pillow with glass focal button.

Fiona Abel-Smith

Fiona Abel-Smith

Earth Flower Bowl

The Earth is a like a precious jewel, nestled in the centre of the universal flower. We need to care for her, and nurture her as, like the seeded centre of any flower, she is our future. The flower may appear dark, but is actually made up with a shimmering array of colours if you look deeply, and nestled in each unfurled petal are stars, shining with possibilities.

Cupping the bowl are tendrils of smooth flame, representing the bursts of warmth and light from the sun which keep the flower nourished and safe.

The whole piece is made with Polymer Clay. The ‘earth’ was made from 2 skinner blends using the Pietra Dura technique, (where individual little pieces of clay are inlaid into a clay background), as were the petals, and the anthers. All of the stars and the petal outlines were carved and drilled then backfilled. The piece is 8.5 inches diameter, and 2.5 inches high (21 x 5 cm)."

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